Tags: star wars sunday

year of the cat

Star Wars Sunday: Vice-Admiral Holdo and the Importance of Costuming

I recently came across this Hollywood Reporter interview with the costume designer for The Last Jedi. Here's the bit I want to talk about:

One of the film’s most feminine looks was a draped, cape-back jersey gown worn by Vice Admiral Holdo (Laura Dern).

I thought when I read the script that Holdo would be wearing a uniform, so I did some uniform designs and showed them to Rian and he said, "Oh no, no, no, no. She’s flirting with Oscar Isaacs’ character, I don’t want her to be in a uniform, I want her to be unique and almost balletic." He said, "I’d like to see her body and her body language, and her silhouette, and have her be more feminine." So I started thinking about feminine balletic design, and something kind of Greek, which made me start thinking about jersey, and then I started thinking about Madame Gres. So that’s where that came from.

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year of the cat

Star Wars Meta: Jedi & First Order Recruitment and the Effects of Child Separation

Thanks to Trump’s horrific and unconscionable policies of separating immigrant children from their parents, the public is learning a lot about the long-term effects of such practices on children. As it turns out, it’s really damaging both physically and psychologically. Within the world of Star Wars, there are two organizations, the Jedi Order and the First Order, which permanently separate children from their parents before the age of five. Let's talk about the implications of that, shall we?

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year of the cat

Star Wars Meta: An Orderly Upbringing

According to the Disney tie-in material, the First Order's recruitment and training program was based on the Jedi recruitment and training program by its creator, Brendo Hux. There's a lot to unpack there, but let's start with the basics. How are the training programs of the Jedi Order and the First Order similar and how did they differ? What do those similarities and differences say about them as institutions?

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year of the cat

Star Wars Meta: Jedi Cult?

I like to joke about how the Jedi are actually just a messed up space cult, but let’s take a look at that claim, shall we? The International Cult Studies Association defines a cult as “an ideological organization held together by charismatic relations and demanding total commitment.” Sounds like the Jedi to me. Cults can vary widely in terms of the degree of control they exert over their members. The greater the degree of internal control, the higher the risk of physical or psychological harm to members. The Advanced Bonewits’ Cult Danger Evaluation Frame is a handy 18-factor frame work for identifying just how controlling, and thus how potentially dangerous, any cult-like group is. Each factor is evaluated on a sliding scale with 1 as low and 10 as high. Groups which score highly in five or more factors can be classified as potentially dangerous cults.

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year of the cat

Star Wars Meta: The Dictator's Playbook

PBS has a new show called The Dictator's Playbook, which looks at a bunch of real world dictators and analysis their rise to power. Watching it, one of the things that struck me is that most (successful) dictators do something which benefit's the masses immediately upon taking power as a means of gaining their support. Kim Il-Sung implemented land reforms which gave peasants their own farms for the first time in ever. Saddam Hussain granted equal rights for women and used oil money for infrastructure projects, free universal health care, and free universal education. Mussolini made the trains run on time. It got me thinking. What, exactly, did Palpatine and the Empire do to cement the loyalty of the masses?

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year of the cat

Star Wars Meta: On Prophetic Dreams and Visions

Force visions and prophetic dreams to be part of the skillset of even untrained Force sensitives. In the prequels, Anakin dreams about becoming a Jedi (TPM), his mother's death (AotC), and Padme's death (RotS). In The Empire Strikes Back, Luke has a vision about his friends being in trouble. In The Clone Wars episode "Assassin," Ahsoka has a dream and series of visions about an attempt on Padme's life. In Star Wars: Rebels, Ezra has a vision of Gall Trayvis and later a dream about his parents. In The Force Awakens, we learn that Rey has been dreaming of Luke's island long before she ever set foot there. So here's my question: if Force visions and prophetic dreams are a known ability, why did Anakin receive such consistently bad advice on dealing with his?

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